Tag Archives: sugar

Exercise? I don’t wanna!

Excellent post on getting your butt in gear, and getting healthy. Enjoy!

You’ll Never “Feel” Like It

I was waiting for an appointment yesterday and the woman noticed I was wearing a Mohr Results Boot Camp jacket.  She asked about it and said “wow, that sounds fun … we did a Biggest Loser program here at work, but IT didn’t work.”

I came back and asked what didn’t work about it.

She said — OK, well I guess I didn’t try.  I really didn’t feel like working to change.

Now I didn’t quite say this, but in my head I thought…

“You’re NEVER going to feel like it!”

While she was talking about losing weight, this is really in reference to anything in life … any change you want to make.

Yes In “our” world, that’s losing weight.  Improving your diet.  Exercising daily.

I recently made a confession how I had been slacking with my daily routine.

Although I’ve since been back at it in full force, mixing some variety into my workouts with more TRX, kettlebells, hill sprints (and loving the unseasonably warm weather in Louisville so I’m not out there in 20 degrees), etc … I too finally said in my head that “NOW is the time because I would never feel like it.”

In fact we also heard a recent interview with author and radio personality Mel Robbins where she quotes some research saying it takes just 5 seconds for a thought to leave you.  In other words, if you’re sitting on the couch and thinking “I should get up and go exercise,” within 5 seconds if you don’t act, it’s gone.

Interesting.

So here’s how you need to take this to the next level.

First, decide WHY you want to make change.  The outcome you’re after.

Getting healthy is NOT a good reason.

‘Health’ is like a moving target without a solid definition because it’s different for everyone.

So scratch “I want to get healthy” off the list.  Of course that’s an outcome that will result from changing behaviors.

What’s the REAL reason?

It might be 100% focused on your appearance.  That’s fine.

It may very well seem selfish.  Even better.

Why?

Because when YOU personally want to make change, it needs to be about YOU and what’s in it for you.  Not your spouse, kids, girlfriend, boyfriend or whoever else.

Now here’s step #2.  You’ve figure out your REAL why.

Make it very specific.

Fit better in your clothes isn’t specific enough.

Do you want to drop a pants size?  Two pants sizes?

Now we’re getting somewhere.

Finally and most importantly, what behaviors are necessary to achieve this outcome?

A goal that’s focused on the behaviors to achieve the desired outcome is the one that will get you the results you want.

Focus on the behaviors, not the outcome, if you want to achieve permanent success.

And this all goes back to the line from the interview we listened to the other day “You’re never going to feel like it.”

You’re never going to feel like taking the necessary steps to make change permanent, but as soon as you do have that previously fleeting thought that you want to make change, TAKE ACTION.

Your action may not be perfect, but taking action is exactly what’s needed to get the ball rolling!

Source: http://blogs.menshealth.com/bellyoff-nutritionist/youll-never-feel-like-it/2012/02/29/?cm_mmc=Twitter-_-MensHealth-_-Content-Blogs-_-HowToChange

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Balancing Your Plate

Unfortunately I can’t find the original source of this article- it was torn out of a magazine some time ago. All I can tell you is; it’s written by Sharon Liao and is pretty interesting. Enjoy this short piece on what should be on your plate!

The Ultimate Balanced Diet

What should really be on your plate? New research has some fascinating answers to an age-old question.

Quick, what’s the best way to lose weight and stay healthy? Drastically cut carbs, go very lowfat, become a vegan, or simply count calories? With all the conflicting advice these days about what you should be eating, it’s hard not to have diet whiplash. A recent avalanche of news, however, is finally all pointing in the same direction- toward a moderate, eminently doable regime that dividesyour daily intake evenly among three food groups: carbohydrates, protein, and fats.

One recent student from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology found that when people who had been eating a higher-carb, lower-protein diet were put on a balanced-ration plan, they showed positive changes in their DNA that may translate into less inflammation in the body- which can reduce your risk for heart disease, cancer and other chronic diseases.

At the same time, a growing body of research suggests that eating this way might also be a simple shortcut to losing pounds faster- and that getting enough protein in particular is key. “Protein, fat, and carbs work with each other to promote a greater sensation of satisfaction,” explains New York City- based nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix, R.D., author of Read It Before You Eat It. “When you skimp on one group like protein, you tend to compensate by overeating something else you don’t need any more of, like additional carbs or fat.” A recent study in the journal PLoS ONE confirmed that pattern. When people lowered their daily intake of protein by as little as 5 percent and made up the difference with carbohydrate-rich foods, they consumed an additional 260 calories a day. They told researchers they felt hungrier, especially in the morning, and ended up snacking more frequently throughout the day.

To get the right mix of foods in your meal, Taub-Dix advises concentrating on the quality of the foods, rather than stressing over the exact quantities.  “When you fill your plate with a balanced medley of nutrient-rich foods, you’ll end up feeling physically and emotionally satisfied,” she says. Opt for complex carbs (quinoa, oatmeal, brown rice, veggies), lean meats and legumes (chicken, turkey, almond butter, beans), and sources of healthy fats rich in omega3s (salmon, avocados, walnuts, olive oil), and you’ll find yourself naturally striking the right symmetry.

 


Want an ‘A’ in Class? Lose Some Weight

This article absolutely makes my blood boil. “The plan calls for high school students to be allowed to take a so-called “ideal weight” option in their final year exams, the “baccalaureat”, under which they would earn extra points if they kept a body mass index (BMI) of between 18 and 25″ Yea, that sounds like a perfect plan to start a fantastic outbreak of disordered eating on the opposite side of the spectrum. Unbelievable!

Give slim kids higher marks, says French diet guru

By Vicky Buffery

PARIS— Pierre Dukan, the nutritionist behind the popular but controversial Dukan diet, has suggested that France tackle child obesity by giving extra exam marks for slimness.

Dukan, who has sold 8 million copies of his diet book worldwide, made the proposal in a 250-page book called “An Open Letter to the Future President,” which he sent out on Tuesday to 16 candidates for France’s presidential election.

The plan calls for high school students to be allowed to take a so-called “ideal weight” option in their final year exams, the “baccalaureat”, under which they would earn extra points if they kept a body mass index (BMI) of between 18 and 25.

Those already overweight at the start of the two-year course would score double points if they managed to slim down over a period of two years.

“It’s a fantastic motivator,” Dukan told Reuters.

“The baccalaureat is really important in France. Kids want to get it, their parents want them to even more, so why not get them to work together on nutrition?”

Weight gain is becoming an increasing problem in France and experts say sedentary lifestyles and poor nutrition are to blame.

World Health Organisation (WHO) figures show 50.7 percent of the population were overweight in 2010, including 18.2 percent classed as obese.

“There’s a real problem. Since the 1960s the number of overweight people in France has risen from 500,000 to 22 million and it’s going up every year,” Dukan said.

“When you reach those levels, it’s no longer a health problem, it becomes a political problem, and the leaders of the nation need to worry about it.”

As well as the suggestion for students, Dukan’s book, which will hit French bookshops on Thursday, contains a further 119 suggestions for the future president on ways to fight obesity.

One idea is the creation of a French fast-food restaurant serving more nutritional versions of the ubiquitous burgers and fries.

Dukan has earned an international reputation as diet guru to the stars, although his methods have drawn criticism from some health experts and weightwatchers who say his high-protein meal plan causes fatigue, bad breath and dizziness. But he is also a committed campaigner for the promotion of healthier lifestyles.

He recently met executives from McDonald’s France with a suggestion for a healthy “McDukan” burger, made with low-fat meat and with oatmeal bread instead of the usual white bun. The giant food chain turned him down.

“They were interested, but they said the public wasn’t quite ready for it yet,” he said.

The BMI, obtained by dividing a person’s weight by the square of their height, is used as an indicator of the proportion of body fat. The WHO defines a BMI of 18.5 to 25 as normal, 25 to 30 as overweight, and over 30 as obese.

Source: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/45860717/ns/health-diet_and_nutrition/#.TwPajPKwX0Q


HCG:Only Your Wallet Gets Thinner

Considering a more radical approach to weight loss? Like maybe taking a hormone injection or diluted hormone drops? Don’t.

Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG) for Fat Loss: “Fallacy and Hazard”

One of the great things about this site is that people often bring products or research to our attention that we otherwise might have missed. This occurred yesterday in the comments section of Peter’s recent post on Acai Berry scams, when one of our readers brought up the use of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG) in the treatment of obesity. The website that we were provided smacks of weight loss gimmickry – notably the promise of an obesity “cure” and “near 100% success rate”, but we thought it best to review the evidence before making a judgement one way or the other.

The use of HCG to treat obesity was first suggested by ATW Simeons in a 1954 Lancet paper. He reported that injection of HCG resulted in rapid mobilization of body fat stores and induced feelings of well-being. He also claimed that HCG reduced weakness and hunger during very low calorie diets (500kcal/day) and that HCG treatment could be used to prevent the protein and vitamin deficiencies which are a frequent side-effect of such low caloric intake. Finally, he suggested that HCG could be used to successfully treat a range of ailments ranging from diabetes and gout to ulcers and skin diseases. However, it is important to note that no actual study was performed – these were just subjective observations. Naturally, Simeons’ observations spurred actual research into HCG.

Unfortunately for Simeons’ pet theory, the vast preponderance of studies examining the effectiveness of HCG in the treatment of obesity found absolutely no effect. For example, a 1976 paperin the Journal of the American Medical Association performed a rigorously controlled, double-blind crossover study examining the effects of HCG on weight loss in obese individuals undergoing very low calorie diets. In a double-blind study, neither the patient, nor the physician, knows whether the patient is receiving HCG or a placebo. What were their results? Both groups lost a significant amount of weight (not surprising given subjects were only consuming 500 kcal/day), however there was no difference in weight loss between the HCG and placebo treatments.

However, sites which promote HCG such as the HCG Diet Info Blogclaim that it doesn’t matter if there was no difference in weight loss – HCG promotes fat loss, and preserves muscle mass. So both groups might have lost the same weight, but the HCG group might have lost more fat, and preserved more muscle than the other group. Luckily, the above paper examined this possibility as well, and report that there was no difference in fat loss between the HCG and placebo treatments. So, this study strongly suggests that HCG does not enhance fat loss, nor does it preserve muscle mass.

Ok, that’s only one study, and to be fair there is one study by Asher and Harperwhich suggests that HCG might have some effect on weight loss. However, that is the only well designed study to show such a link, while numerous other studies have shown conclusive evidence that HCG does not enhance weight loss, reduce hunger, or increase the sense of well-being. For example, a meta-analysis in the British Journal of Pharmacology examining all of the research on HCG concluded that:

there is no scientific evidence that HCG is effective in the treatment of obesity; it does not bring about weight loss or fat redistribution, nor does it reduce hunger or induce a feeling of well-being.

Interestingly, they report that most of the studies were of poor methodological quality, and of the 12 studies with the strongest methodologies and proper controls, 11 showed HCG to be utterly useless in inducing weight or fat loss. Additionally, they point out that the use of HCG is also unethical, given that “HCG is obtained from the urine of pregnant women who donate their urine idealistically in the belief that it will be used to treat… infertility”. That’s right – it comes from the urine of pregnant women!

That’s not all. An editorial by John Ballin and Philp White in the Journal of the American Medical Associationtitled “Fallacy and Hazard” claims that “no rational basis exists for [HCG] use in weight reduction, except as placebo“. Further “Weight loss under the Simeons regimen can be attributed solely to the semistarvation diet that is required”, a diet which is so restricted as to raise safety concerns. Finally, they claim that way that Simeons weight clinics are run “pose serious questions for physicians who participate in them”.

But if the evidence clearly suggests that HCG is completely useless in the treatment of obesity, why is HCG so popular? Well, it may have something to do with its inclusion in Kevin Trudeau’s book “The Weight Loss Cure”, which has been dissected by Dr. Yoni Freedhoff and others in the past.

Interestingly, the best argument against the use of HCG therapy actually comes from the companies which peddle the product. For example, the disclaimer on the website of Trim You, a company that certifies and promotes weight loss clinics adhering to the original Dr Simeons Diet Protocol reads thusly:

” The FDA has not approved HCG Therapy to lose weight. “HCG HAS NOT BEEN DEMONSTRATED TO BE EFFECTIVE ADJUNCTIVE THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF OBESITY. THERE IS NO SUBSTANTIAL EVIDENCE THAT IT INCREASES WEIGHT LOSS BEYOND THAT RESULTING FROM CALORIC RESTRICTION, THAT IT CAUSES A MORE ATTRACTIVE OR “NORMAL” DISTRIBUTION OF FAT, OR THAT IT DECREASES THE HUNGER AND DISCOMFORT ASSOCIATED WITH CALORIE-RESTRICTED DIETS.””

Enough said.

Travis Saunders

Want to hear an internist’s point of view on HCG for weight loss? You’re in luck! Peter Lipson, M.D., (a board certified internist and clinical assistant professor of medicine in the Midwest) wrote an excellent little piece on the issue:

hCG diet: Weight loss is hard, and human pregnancy hormone won’t change that

Is injecting yourself with human pregnancy hormone a good idea? Certainly not! But unfortunately we need to look a little more closely.

hCG Diet is Too Good to be True

Here’s a little tip for you: if a diet sounds too good to be true, then it is. Weight loss is very hard, unless you are very sick. In fact, a colleague of mine ran into a friend who had lost a lot of weight and said, “You’re OK, aren’t you?” As an internist, when I see dramatic weight loss, my first thought is cancer, not a wildly successful new diet. But all of us overweight types wish there were an easy way.

There isn’t. A friend of mine heard about a diet that involves extreme calorie restriction along with injections of human chorionic gonadotrophic hormone(hCG). My first thought was if you restrict yourself to 500-800 calories per day, it doesn’t matter what you inject — you’re going to lose weight. But as is the usual pattern with psuedo-scientific woo, each time you try to rebut it, there is a new claim.

For example, when you point out that starvation diets will always make you lose weight, they say that this onemakes you not hungry. When you say that it sounds dubious, they say that it not only makes you not hungry, it causes you to somehow lose weight where you want it, and keep it where you like it.

hCG Diet Promoter was Accused by the FTC of Deceptive Advertising

So what experts are behind this revolutionary diet? Well, the biggest proponent appears to be Kevin Trudeau, the infomercial guy who went to jail for fraud. The company that marketed his book has also had an injunction levied against it by the Federal Trade Commission for deceptive advertising. What kind of claims is he making?

Now, for the first time in fifty years, this revolutionary breakthrough discovery, which permanently cures the condition of obesity, is being released to the public.

Richard Dawkins has a great statement about claims like this one:

If you are in possession of this revolutionary secret of science, why not prove it and be hailed as the new Newton? Of course, we know the answer. You can’t do it. You are a fake.

As fate would have it, scientists have actually investigated this “miracle cure for obesity.”

Not only is the diet no more effectivethan calorie restriction alone, the hCG also doesn’t affect hunger or other more subjective factors of dieting.

Look, no one likes being obese, and despite what fake experts like Sandy Szwarcsay, it’s bad for you. But there is no magic. To lose weight, energy in has to be less than energy out, and when you do that, you will feel hungry. It sucks, it’s hard, but at this point, it’s all we’ve got.

SOURCES:

http://scienceblogs.com/obesitypanacea/2010/03/human_chorionic_gonadotropin_h.php

http://calorielab.com/news/2008/04/27/news-flash-weight-loss-is-hard/


Healthy Snacks

Craving a snack? Pick a healthy one!

30 healthy picks

Great snacks with less than 200 calories

By Wendy Giman

Craving salty?

  • 5 olives (any kind) (45 calories)
  • 1 small Martin’s pretzel (50 calories)
  • 2 oz Applegate Honey and Maple Turkey Breast wrapped around 2 bread-and-butter pickles (80 calories)
  • 1/4 cup hummus, 3 carrot sticks (80 calories)
  • 1 Laughing Cow Light Swiss Original wedge, 3 pieces Kavli Crispy Thin (85 calories)
  • One 1-oz package tuna jerky (90 calories)
  • 1 oz buffalo mozzarella, 1/2 cup cherry or grape tomatoes (94 calories)
  • 1 bag Baked! Cheetos 100 Calorie Mini Bites (100 calories)
  • 15 Eden’s Nori Maki Crackers rice crackers (110 calories)
  • 1 cup unshelled edamame(120 calories)
  • 50 Eden’s Vegetable Chips (130 calories)
  • One 1-oz package of Planters NUT-trition almonds(130 calories)
  • 1/4 cup Trader Joe’s Chili con Queso, 18 baked tortilla chips (140 calories)
  • 1/2 cup pumpkinseeds in shell (143 calories)
  • 2 pieces (30 grams) prosciutto, 4 dried figs (154 calories)
  • 1 Subway Turkey Breast Wrap (190 calories)

Craving sweet?

  • 1 package Original Apple Nature Valley Fruit Crisps (50 calories)
  • 1 packet O’Coco’s Mocha cookies (90 calories)
  • 1 Jelly Belly 100-calorie pack (100 calories)
  • One 100-calorie pack Trader Joe’s Chocolate Graham Toucan Cookies (100 calories)
  • One 100-calorie Balance Bar (100 calories)
  • 1 Starbucks Mocha Frappuccino bar (120 calories)
  • 1 package Back to Nature Honey Graham Sticks (120 calories)
  • 1/2 bananarolled in 1 tbsp frozen semisweet chocolate chips (123 calories)
  • 2 tbsp Better ‘n Peanut Butter, 4 stalks celery (124 calories)
  • 1 bag Orville Redenbacher’s Smart Pop Butter Mini Bagstopped with a spritz of butter spray and 1 tsp sugar (126 calories)
  • 24 Annie’s Chocolate Chip Bunny Graham cookies (140 calories)
  • Half of a 1.08-oz container of M&M’s Minis mixed with 1/3 cup lowfat granola (145 calories)
  • 1 McDonald’s Fruit ‘n Yogurt Parfait (160 calories)
  • 1 container Fage Greek Total 2% fat yogurt, 2 tsp honey (173 calories)

Healthy Weight Loss

A short article from Health.com on Dieting for weight loss.

Healthy Eating for Weight Loss

By Tara Gidus, MS, RD, CSSD, LD/N

 

With two-thirds of Americans either overweight or obese, weight is a concern for many people. Carrying excess body weight comes with increased risk of diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, some cancers, osteoarthritis, and sleep apnea. Losing weight is not just a cosmetic change, but also it leads to serious improvements in health.

Be Realistic

Even dropping five to 15 percent of your body weight may help prevent disease and improve quality of life. If reaching the ideal weight for your height from a chart is unattainable or overwhelming, start smaller with more realistic goals. A safe weight loss should be one to two pounds per week for most people. The heavier you are, the faster the weight may come off in the beginning.

Simple Math

In order to lose weight, you need to burn more calories than you are eating. This seems like simple math on paper, but actually doing it is more difficult. On paper, a pound of fat is equivalent to 3,500 calories. In order to lose one pound of fat in a week, you need a deficit of 500 calories per day (3,500 ÷ 7 days = 500 per day). It is best if you exercise to burn some of these calories and decrease your caloric intake to make up the rest of the deficit.

Calories In

Determining exactly how many calories you are eating is not easy. Even the most careful tracker can be off by more than a few hundred calories. Weighing and measuring food is the most precise way but most people don’t have the time or energy to do that, and there are still no guarantees.

Calories Out

Knowing exactly how many calories you are burning is also an inexact science. It depends on your metabolism and daily activity. The more you move, the higher your calories out will be.

Portion Control

Even if they are making smarter food choices, for most people the biggest problem is still eating portions that are too large. Use smaller plates and take smaller portions to start. Eat slowly and pay attention to what it feels like to be satisfied, and stop eating before you’re stuffed.

Calorie Count

Just because something is low-fat does not mean that it is low-calorie. Read labels carefully, and remember that every calorie counts. Choose foods that will fill you up such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, and lean meats. Foods high in refined grains and sugars may taste good but they are not filling and will leave you wanting more.

Eat Light and Often

Instead of one or two big meals each day, spread your calories among small meals with snacks in between to bridge your hunger and metabolism.

Controlling weight is not easy, but with careful portion and meal planning and exercise you can reach your desired goal without depriving yourself.

 


Lose the Weight, Lose the Stones

More and more I’m being contacted by clients looking to lose weight to deal with medical problems, such as hypertension, pre-diabetic blood sugar levels, and now, kidney stones. It is true that many medical problems are exacerbated by excess body weight and kidney stones are no different. Here is some great information on kidney stones and obesity.

Weight Gain, Obesity Linked to Kidney Stones

Risk of Developing Kidney Stones May Be Another Reason to Maintain Healthy Weight

Being obese or gaining weightmay increase the risk of developing painful kidney stones, and women may be especially vulnerable to these added risks, according to a new study.

Researchers found women who weighed more than 220 pounds were 90% more likely to develop kidney stones than those who weighed less than 150 pounds. Men and women who gained more than 35 pounds since they were 21 years old also had a 39% to 82% higher risk of kidney stones.

Kidney stones are made of salts, minerals, and other substances normally found in urine. When the normal balance of water and other substances is out of balance, such as from dehydration, these substances stick together and build up to form stones. As the stones pass through the urinary system, they can cause sudden, intense pain, nausea and vomiting, and blood in the urine.

Researchers estimate that 10% of men and 5% of women develop kidney stones during their lifetime, and more than $2 billion is spent each year on treating the painful condition.

Although higher BMIs (body mass index, a measure of weight in relation to height used to indicate obesity) and insulin resistancemay increase the amount of calcium and other substances in the urine, researchers say that few studies have looked at the association between obesity and/or weight gain and the risk of developing kidney stones.

Weight May Raise Kidney Stone Risks

In the study, researchers analyzed data from three large study groups: the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and the Nurses’ Health Study I and II, which included nearly 250,000 men and women.

After adjusting for age, diet, fluid intake, and the use of water pills (known as diuretics) that might affect the risk of kidney stones, researchers found obesity was strongly linked to kidney stone development.

For example:

  • Men weighing more than 220 pounds had a 44% higher risk of kidney stones compared with men who weighed less than 150 pounds.
  • Older women (aged 34-59) who weighed more than 220 pounds had an 89% higher risk of kidney stones compared with those weighing less than 150 pounds. Younger women in this higher weight category had a 92% higher risk.
  • Men who gained more than 35 pounds since age 21 had a 39% higher risk of kidney stones compared with men whose weight did not change.
  • Older women who gained a similar amount since age 21 had a 70% higher risk of developing kidney stones, and younger women had an 82% higher risk.

In addition, researchers found having a higher BMI or waist size was also associated with a higher risk of kidney stones.

The results of the study appear in the Jan. 26 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.

“Further studies should explore the effect of obesity and sex on urine composition, and weight loss should be explored as a potential treatment to prevent kidney stone formation,” write researcher Eric N. Taylor, MD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and colleagues.

But for now, researchers say people have one more reason to maintain a healthy weight and avoid weight gain.

So what is your best bet in fighting off the occurrence of kidney stones? Lose the excess weight and get your body to a healthy weight. You may still be prone to stones, but you can do your best to stop the bad habits that can increase your risk of stone frequency as well as other medical problems.

source: http://www.webmd.com/kidney-stones


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